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Success in History

Purpose of study

 

A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

 

Aims

 

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts: understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales

 

History Long Term Plan

 

2021 - 2022

Autumn

Spring

 

Summer

Year 1

Toys from the Past

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Find similarities and differences between ways of life at different times.
  • Ask and answer questions about the past.
  • Understand some of the ways we find out about the past.
  • Use stories and sources to show knowledge and understanding.
  • Record what they have found out about the past.

The Titanic

To know about events beyond living memory that are significant nationally/ globally.

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Find similarities and differences between ways of life at different times.
  • Ask and answer questions about the past.
  • Understand some of the ways we find out about the past.
  • Use stories and sources to show knowledge and understanding.
  • Know the difference between past and present in pupils own and others lives 
  • Record what they have found out about the past.
  • Recognise and explain why people did things and what happened because of it  

Kings and Queens

To know about the lives of significant individuals in the past who contributed to national and international achievements.

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Describe key events
  • Understand the impact significant people have had
  • To ask and answer questions about the past.
  • Use a range of sources to find out about the past.

To make comparisons with their own lives and those from before they were born.

Year 2

Pirates. Was Grace O’Malley a Pirate?

To know about the lives of significant individuals in the past who contributed to national and international achievements.

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Describe key events and the lives of some famous people who lived in the past and say why they were famous.
  • Consider why people did what they did in the past
  • Use a range of sources to find out about the past.
  • To make comparisons with their own lives and those from before they were born.
  • To ask and answer questions about the past.
  • To use vocabulary related to the past and passage of time.
  • To record their findings about the past in arrange of ways.
  • Comparisons between time periods studied.

 

Great Fire of London

To know about events beyond living memory that are significant nationally/ globally.

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Describe key events
  • Use a range of sources to find out about the past.
  • To make comparisons with their own lives and those from before they were born.
  • Consider what people did in the past.
  • To ask and answer questions about the past.
  • To use vocabulary related to the past and passage of time.
  • To record their findings about the past in arrange of ways.

 

Year 2 make links to present day by comparing The Great Fire of London to Grenfell Tower

Local comparison to a non-European village

Similarities and differences between ways of life in a village in Africa over different time periods to our locality.

The Masai Mara

  • Simple chronology – use a timeline
  • Describe key events
  • To make comparisons with their own lives and those from before they were born.
  • To record their findings about the past in arrange of ways.
  • Comparisons between time periods studied.
  • Explain why people did things and what happened as a result, giving reasons 
  • Communicate knowledge through: painting and collage, writing, drama, making models and using ICT 

 

Year 3

Local History Study – child apprentice and Quarry Bank Mill

Comparison between life as a child apprentice and rights Malala fought in recent years.

(Builds prior knowledge for Year 5’s local Manchester study)

Stone age to Iron Age

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

  • Develop chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of Britain from Stone – Iron Age.
  • Find out about the everyday lives of the people studied and compare with modern life
  • Develop their skills in drawing on similarities and differences and compare and contrast by explaining how Britain changed during the Bronze and Iron Ages using a timeline to support.
  • Develop their critical thinking skills through studying Bronze and Iron Age artefacts and using prior knowledge to explain their uses.
  • Look at religious beliefs and explain how they evolved through these times.
  • Begin to understand how events in history link and follow on from each other by using knowledge and skills to explain how the Roman Invasion brought an end to the Iron Age.
  • Look at the impact the Stone to Iron Age had on Britain today by looking at what the Stone Age people left us and how we know it existed.

Ancient Egypt

  • The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of when the first civilizations appeared and an depth study of Ancient Egypt.
  • Develop chronological understanding through placing Ancient Egypt on a timeline and sequencing several events.
  • Develop critical thinking and enquiry skills through use of sources to question and find out about life in Ancient Egypt.
  • Compare and contrast other civilizations and their settlements

Look at artifacts

Year 4

Romans

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain.

  • Historical chronology – use of timelines
  • Historical vocabulary and phrases (e.g. BC/AD)
  • Significant events and people
  • Begin to make connections and contrast – cause and effect.  Why did the Romans come to Britain? what effect did they have?
  • Look at beliefs and ideas people held.
  • Study a range of sources and use these to ask and answer historically valid questions.
  • Present findings about the past in a variety of ways

Anglo-Saxons

Britain’s settlements by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.

  • Historical chronology – use of timelines.  Begin to place events accurately.
  • Historical vocabulary and phrases (e.g. BC/AD)

Significant events and people

  • Look at similarities and differences between time periods studied (link to Romans)
  • Look at beliefs and ideas people held.
  • Study a range of sources and use these to ask and answer historically valid questions.
  • Present findings about the past in a variety of ways

 

South America

  • Chronology – looking at difference in rainforests overtime and cause / effect

indigenous tribes of South America

Year 5

Vikings

The Anglo-Saxon and Viking struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.

  • Apply knowledge of chronology
  • Develop timelines to show events and developments
  • Look at trends over time – invasion, conquer and settle – link back to previous learning (Romans/ Egypt).
  • Begin to see the relationship between different periods and the legacy or impact for me and my identify.
  • Study a range of sources considering bias.  Use these to ask and answer more complex historically valid questions.
  • Record findings in a variety of ways.

Empires

Study of a non-European Society that provides contrast with British history.

  • Apply knowledge of chronology
  • Develop timelines to show events and developments
  • Compare and contrast with Anglo-Saxons/ Vikings of same period.
  • Study complexity of people’s lives and how some societies are very different due to changes and challenges at the time.
  • Study a range of sources considering bias.  Use these to ask and answer more complex historically valid questions.
  • Record findings in a variety of ways.

(Draws on knowledge of Prehistory gained in Year 3 Stone Age Topic to support understanding and use of sources and reliability. Compare Stone Age in Britain and in Mesoamerica)

Local Study: Manchester

How several aspects of national History are reflected in the locality

Year 6

World at War (Focused study on WW1)

 A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066.

  • Historical chronology – overview of past (Britain and the world). Place within a chronological narrative.
  • Identify key moments of change and development.
  • Discuss trends over time and relationships between time periods and their impact and me and my identity (make links to past learning on WWII/ Invasions – Vikings/ Romans)
  • Show understanding for the complexity of people’s lives in the past and how some societies are very different due to changes at the time.
  • Interpret a range of sources with an awareness of viewpoint and possible bias. Making judgments on the value of certain sources.
  • Devise own historically valid questions and answer more complex questions about the past.
  • Able to use sources to support a conclusion

Enquiry: Changes in local History – Air pollution from Industrial Revolution to now

Ancient Greece

The study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world.

  • Historical chronology – overview of past (Britain and the world). Place within a chronological narrative (links to other civilizations pre and post Ancient Greece – link to the Romans and then their influence in invading Britain).
  • Identify key moments of change and development
  • Show understanding for the complexity of people’s lives in the past and how some societies are very different due to changes at the time.
  • Interpret a range of sources with an awareness of viewpoint and possible bias. Making judgments on the value of certain sources.
  • Devise own historically valid questions and answer more complex questions about the past.

 Able to use sources to support a conclusion

History Progression Ladders

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