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Reading At Home

 

Schools Expectations 

 

EYFS and Ks1 

 

Reading – 10 minutes a night

Listening to your child read for 10 minutes a night makes a significant difference in their progress and attainment. It helps them practice key reading strategies and skills, develop their comprehension skills and supports their overall fluency and accuracy, which are vital skills they need for the future. Every Friday an eBook will be assigned to your child’s online account based upon the sounds they have learnt in phonics that week. The children will have practiced this book in their guided reading sessions so will be familiar with the text. The purpose of them practicing it again at home is to become more familiar with these sounds and fluent when reading them.

 

Your child will also choose a reading for pleasure book. This is a book that you can both read and enjoy together and encourage reading for pleasure. This will be a physical book that your child takes home and they will be given the opportunity to choose and change every Friday. As it is a reading for pleasure book, it is not necessarily aimed at your child’s reading level, therefore can be challenging, which is why we are asking for an adult to read this and your child to join in where possible. The reading for pleasure book is important as it is how we will help build a love of reading together.   Please ensure your child brings this back to school every Friday ready to change in our school Library.

 

Reading eggs – once a week      https://readingeggs.co.uk

Reading eggs makes learning to read interesting and engaging for kids, with great online reading games and activities. Children love the games, songs, golden eggs and other rewards which, along with feeling proud of their reading, really motivate children to keep exploring and learning.

 

Key Stage Two 

 

 Reading - Pupils should be reading for 10-15 minutes every night. Pupils can change their books as and when they need to in the Class Library or the KS2 Library. Year 5/6 pupils are welcome to bring in books from home. Please help your child to record their reading in their Reading Record. Listening to your child read can support their fluency, develop their comprehension skills, and help them to progress.

https://schoolreadinglist.co.uk/reading-lists-for-ks2-school-pupils/suggested-reading-list-for-year-5-pupils-ks2-age-9-10/ Here are some recommended reads - how many of these books have you read?

 

Reading Eggs – Children have a weekly comprehension assignment to complete on Reading Eggs.

Reading eggs makes learning to read interesting and engaging for kids, with great online reading games and activities. Children love the games, songs, golden eggs and other rewards which, along with feeling proud of their reading, really motivate children to keep exploring and learning.

 

 

How to support your child's reading at home:

 

Reading aloud to your child daily. As often as possible. This is still the #1 way to support early readers and ensure that your child has the best possible start at reading. And it’s fun!

 

What books? Any books are fine for reading aloud. You are doing the reading and modeling and your child is benefiting in a lot of ways!

 

Got a library card? Perfect! Head over to the children’s section and allow your child to choose some books. Choice is a powerful motivator so the more you can include your child in the books you read together, the better!

 

How about making there own books? Have your child tell you a story and you write the words. She can go back and add pictures. Then read the story together. You will be surprised how well children can read books they create themselves!

 

Read, read, read it again

 

We call this repeated reading. When your child is able to read a book, have her read it over and over again until she reads it fluently and flawlessly — with expression too! She can read it to all the members of the family, the childminder, brother, the dogs, and cats, or even her stuffed teddies. The key is repetition. 

 

Talk about what you read with your child

 

Pause during the story and ask questions about the characters.

*It’s always best to phrase your question as if you were asking yourself — or thinking out loud. Don’t make this a quiz! Just have fun.

 

“I wonder why Harry was afraid. What do you think?”

 

Help your child identify with the characters or the problem/conflict in the story.

 

“I remember a time that I was afraid during a storm. Have you ever been afraid during a storm?”

 

Process the events in the story by reviewing what’s happened so far.

 

“So far Harry has visited his best friend, made some potions, and what else has happened?”

 

Take time to look at the pictures — they are there for an important reason: to help your child comprehend the story better.

 

“Look at Susanna as she lays in bed. What do you think she is thinking or feeling?” “How can you tell?”

 

Make predictions about what will happen next.

“I wonder if Susanna will run to her grandma’s room? What do you think she’ll do next?”

Supporting reading at home

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